Home | Video | Issues | Photos | Fishing Info | Charter Boat Directory | Tournaments | Recipes
Delaware’s Advisory Council on Tidal Finfisheries will meet at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20 in the DNREC Auditorium, 89 Kings Highway, Dover, DE 19901. Capt. Monty Hawkins Report Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Meeting in Annapolis, MD: December 9-12, 2019 The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council will hold its next meeting December 9-12, 2019 at the Westin Annapolis (100 Westgate Circle, Annapolis, MD Delaware’s Advisory Council on Tidal Finfisheries will meet at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20 in the DNREC Auditorium, 89 Kings Highway, Dover, DE 19901. Council on Recreational Fishing Funding to meet Nov. 12 in Dover DNREC Division of Fish & Wildlife’s artificial reef program sinks retired cruise ship Newest reef addition will be ‘magnet’ for fish and other marine life ASMFC Finds the Commonwealth of Virginia Out of Compliance with Amendment 3 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Menhaden Weakfish Assessment Update Indicates Stock is Depleted Total Mortality Exceeds Threshold; Overfishing is not Occurring ASMFC Atlantic Striped Bass Board Approves Addendum VI Striped Bass Index Documents Below-Average Year
DNREC seeking volunteers for Saturday, March 19 beach grass planting along Delaware Bay and Atlantic Ocean coastlines
Monday, February 22, 2016

DOVER (Feb. 22, 2016) – DNREC is seeking volunteers for Delaware’s annual beach grass planting event set for 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, March 19 at beach locations along the Delaware Bay and Atlantic Ocean. The event, now in its 27th year, helps protect Delaware shorelines by planting Cape American beach grass on sand dunes damaged by coastal storms.

Last year approximately 1,000 environmental enthusiasts, families and students planted 110,000 stems of beach grass along over 3 miles of coastline between Kitts Hummock Beach and Fenwick Island.

According to Jennifer Luoma, environmental scientist with DNREC’s Shoreline and Waterway Management Section and coordinator of the event, volunteers are especially needed this year. “Delaware’s coastline was ravaged by the January storm that weakened, and in some areas destroyed dunes and eroded sand from our beaches. The dunes were hit especially hard, and hundreds of volunteers are needed to help stabilize dunes that have been repaired after the coastal storm.”

Volunteers are encouraged to sign up by March 11, 2016 either online at http://de.gov/beachgrass or by email to [email protected] For more information, call 302-739-9921.

Sand dunes are essential for protection against damaging coastal storms. When sand dunes are destroyed, storm waves can rush inland, flood properties and put lives at risk. Stabilized dunes absorb wave energy and act as major sand storage areas, which replenish sand to eroded beaches during a storm.

Beach grass helps to build and stabilize dunes by trapping windblown sand. As the grass traps the sand, it builds the dunes higher and wider, which makes dunes more protective of the structures behind them. Since the program was introduced in 1989, more than 5 million stems of beach grass have been planted by dedicated volunteers.


Current Issue

Order a shirt

Photos

Recipes